“Two other women, also breast cancer survivors, said their husbands left them after they were diagnosed. Both had to have mastectomies (in case anyone doesn’t know, this is the surgical operation to remove one or both breasts). The first woman said her husband told her that he would rather see her dead than see her lose her breasts. The second woman had her operation and waited all day to be picked up by her husband, who never arrived. By nightfall, one of the nurses offered to give her a ride, and she came home to find the house empty. Obviously, these are extreme cases of a man’s reaction to his wife’s breast cancer, but this is what I see when I see the “I ♥ Boobies” bracelets. I see love of the body parts, not the person being treated—not the patient, not the victim, not the survivor.”
onegreenplanet:

Check Out the Rest Here! The Amazing Future of Waste-Free Food Packaging
moma:

Congratulations to David Benjamin of The Living, whose Young Architect’s Program installation at MoMA PS1 received a Holcim Award for sustainability. 

[Installation view of The Living’s Hy-Fi, the winning project of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s 2014 Young Architects Program. June 27-September 7, 2014. Photograph by Kris Graves]
dreaming-in-techni-color:

'The next 30 days are going to pass whether you like it or not, so why not think about something you have always wanted to try and give it a shot for the next 30 days? ' —Matt Cutts
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)
“In the past decade, the court has required Bulgaria to care properly for people with mental and physical disabilities, and Austria to allow same-sex couples to adopt each other’s children. It has forced Cyprus to take action against sex trafficking and Moldova to halt state censorship of TV. Its judgments have compelled improvements in Russian prisons, and more effective punishment of domestic violence in Turkey. In France, laws have been passed to protect domestic servants from forced labour, while illegitimate children now have equal rights to inheritance. Britain has been obliged to take greater care of vulnerable prisoners, regulate the monitoring of employees’ communications, protect the anonymity of journalists’ sources, bring the age of consent for gay people in line with that for heterosexuals and force local councils to observe proper safeguards in evictions.”